Author Archives: Debra Farmer

About Debra Farmer

I'm a wife, mother, and grandma, I live on the plains of central Kansas. I have chickens, goats and a miniature donkey. I also share my life with a very special toy Australian Shepherd, Wylie. Life doesn't get any better than that.

State Flower

The native wild sunflower is the official state flower of Kansas.

A field of sunflowers that were planted in June will be harvested when they turn brown and dry out.

 

I like the tall one.  It’s watching over everyone.

Heads are bowed.  Starting to dry out.

Native sunflowers can be seen in field and in roadside ditches.

 

 

These aren’t sunflowers, but they are yellow and SO pretty.

 

 

 

More Rains And Flooding

We are certainly stuck in a rainy weather pattern. A few hot and humid days then stormy weather returns. This morning I emptied an overflowing rain gauge filled with 5 inches of rain.

Farmer Dry Creek

It will be a few days before I have to mow!!

Outlet at McPherson State Fishing Lake.  A 46 acre fishing lake just west of Maxwell Wildlife Refuge built in 1954.

Impassable low water crossing due to the release of the fishing lake.

Of course I had to stop and take pictures of the wildflowers.

Field of wheat that is flooded

Turn Around – Just south of Hobbs Creek Road, Saline County, KS

We are certainly needing some hot dry windy days so the farmers can get into the fields to harvest.  Praying for them.

Hoglund Dugout

Located west of Lindsborg, KS is the Hoglund Dugout.

Gustaf Hoglund and Maria Olsen were married in 1871.  Living in the dugout they homesteaded 80 acres.  They built a small shanty around the dugout, where they lived until 1880.  At that time they built a large 2 story 5 bedroom, as their family had grown to 8 children.  The home was built to the east of the dugout, which then served as a root cellar.  The children never married or moved from the farm.  The youngest child, Alma died in 1975.

 

The dugout was filled with water due to the all the rains and flooding.  I’ll return to the dugout when it dries out as I’d like to see all the rock work and how deep it is.  The dugout is only a couple miles from Coronado Heights, which is closed due to erosion and the only road being washed out.  Miss going there as it’s so beautiful this time of year with all the yucca, spiderwort and butterfly milkweed.