Weekend in the Flint Hills

We spent a couple of days in the Flint Hills around Cottonwood Falls, one of my favorite places to be.  It was a very cool rainy weekend.

Most of the pastures have been burnt,  the grass is so beautiful and green.  The tallgrass prairies of the Flint Hills are so beautiful any season.

Cattle of the Flint Hills

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Mr. Farmer, we should get some Longhorns!

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Clements, KS

In 1862 a post office was established at Silver Creek (not a ghost town, it’s considered an extinct town).  The rail road came thru the area in 1871 and in 1881 the post office was moved to Crawfordsville, which was renamed to Clements in 1884.

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Double Arch Stone Bridge built in 1887

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Abandoned beautiful majestic home.  South of Cottonwood Falls

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Bushong, Lyon County,  KS.  In 1880 the railroad constructed a depot in a pasture, a town developed beside the track.  Originally called Weeks – it was changed by the railroad crew to Bushong, in honor of a baseball payer, Al “Doc” Bushong.  They also named another town in Lyon County after a baseball player, Comiskey.  At one time there was over 150 residents calling Bushong home, now there are less than 40.  A fire in the 1920’s destroyed a large portion of the town, buildings were never rebuilt.  The railroad has abandoned the track and the railbed is now a nature trail.

This building served as a gas station and tavern.

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This guy calls Bushong home.  He was so beautiful, but noisy!!  He didn’t want me getting too close!

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6 thoughts on “Weekend in the Flint Hills

  1. Jessica Adam

    What an awesome post. I’ve heard of the Flint Hills, but didn’t know any of that history. I love your photos (as always) and I love how they named those towns after baseball players. Very cool.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Debra Farmer Post author

      Thanks Jessica. It’s such a vast area and it looks so different in the spring after they burn the pastures and you can see all the rock in the pastures. Being so rocky the settlers couldn’t plow the ground, so they grazed cattle on it instead of raising crops. It is the last expanse of tallgrass prairie. I’m looking forward to exploring a lot more of the area which runs from near the Nebraska boarder to south of the Kansas/Oklahoma boarder.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. Jessica Adam

        I had no idea it was so rocky. I grew up at Tarkio Mo, which is in northwest corner next to Nebraska and Kansas. There are no rocks up that way. Only block dirt. I figured Kansas was the same.

        Wow! That’s quite a lot of land you’re going to explore. I am a bit jealous that you were at a tall grass prairie. Love love love those.

        Like

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